October Burda

Why do I  buy patterns and pattern mags when I can draft my own? Search me. Some kind of hoarding compulsion, like saving coffee jars for the jam I won’t be making. How about you – buy only what you’ll use, or support an acquisition habit?

The October issue caught me in a bored moment in the papeterie. Much of it seems to have an oversize thing going on, harking back to the early 90s – like this raglan sleeve coat with a wide shawl collar, and its near identical sis with the tie belt.

Coat Rehash

Coat Rehash

Oversize Coat

Oversize Coat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wide trousers with side pockets and pleats are getting a re-run too, but why the tab at the outside seam at the ankle? A pressing complication.  They’ve teamed them with another useful hardy perennial, the cowl top, and a wotsit for pulling over your head and wearing round the shoulders. I’d want to make this hemmed, lined or doubled or something. The raw edge looks cheap.

Oxford Bags Again!

Oxford Bags Again!

This cosy, baggy top will probably suit many of us. Teamed with another useful regular, the straight skirt with front pleats and side pockets. Nicely styled!

Cosy Top, Useful Skirt

Cosy Top, Useful Skirt

What can be said about this?  If it’s cold enough for a coat, I like sleeves. Clumsy is the adjective springing to mind. Burda dub it a Master Piece. What do you think?

No! Please, No.

No! Please, No.

Where are the hallmark Burda misses? Top billing this satin top, with the inexplicable side flaps tacked to the hem and the bulbous neckline pleats. Guaranteed to add kilos. And yes, she is wearing it with the Oxford Bags and brogues. We all have those days.

Bulge in Satin

Bulge in Satin

Runner up in the WTF stakes its got to be this skirt.

Panting Dog Skirt

Panting Dog Skirt

If I’m going to the expense of extra fabric for a pencil skirt and committing to the work of setting a perfect concave to convex seam I don’t want the result to conjour up images of kangaroo pouch or lolling dog tongue. The stylist apparently shared my reservations. If you peer closely at the photo  tongues have become saddle bags. In some alternative universe where I found myself with a dog’s leg of special fabric and a left over strip, and was too idle to think of a better solution, the side position would win.

Can’t see what I’m on about? The waitress ensemble makes it all too clear.

Waitress Outfit, First Trimestre

Waitress Outfit, First Trimestre

Why not waste some decent leather on it? You can always turn it into a bag later. Front  pouch is half way bag already. Make a slit near the waistband and you’ve got both.

Bag-Skirt

Bag-Skirt

Moving to pastures sweeter, there’s a simple, easy to wear button through dress made successfully in viscose, with a less successful version in satin pretending to be a different design (why do they do this?). Burda, we look at the line drawings.

Button-through Dress

Button-through Dress

Another ‘like’ is a kimono cut top, worn with an obi style belt, which unfortunately gets rehashed as a dress with the side panels in impossible to source pleated fabric.

Kimono Top and Obi

Kimono Top and Obi

Burda’s pleated fabric is so lightweight that it is semi transparent. Good luck finding some fine enough not to bunch twixt boobage and waist and solid enough to preserve decency outside a photo shoot.

Pleaty Odball

Pleaty Odball

Still with the pleats, better placed in this dress. I feel sure some creative stitcher will turn out a decent version.

Pleated Dress

Pleated Dress

A long evening dress also goes in my like pile, but are the aerofoils above the waist a feature too many?

Evening Dress

Evening Dress

Less is more, less is more. The basically nice wrap dress is detail rich (too rich?) in the sleeve with a triangle inset at the sleeve head and another at the wrist. Please consider the wrong side of the fabric in the waterfall wrap Burda.

Wrap Dress

Wrap Dress

Hot favourite for me is a design with bands from the side seam to raised neckline, available in a short and long sleeved version. probably not for the uber-busty, but could work on many figures.

Two Tone Jersey Dress

Two Tone Jersey Dress

What do you think? Does any style stand out for you, and which are the bum notes?

Also rans – the cowl neck top as a dress, the suit jacket seen with the horrid skirt above and coat from the same basic design with bunchy gathers and oversize pocket flaps at the waist, the shawl collar coat chopped to become a quilted jacket and some boring blouson variations.

The larger sizes have a couple of formal jackets and trousers which are good to have, and some indifferent tops and dresses, not bad, just nothing to write home about. There are also four children’s patterns in size range 60 to 68 cm chest.

Is it worth the money? The cover claims 51 styles – but several of these are second or third variations. Assuming you don’t need hand holding to lengthen a blouse to a dress or vice versa, or cut a long sleeve shorter or put a different pocket on, you can count on about half that number. That’s still a lot for 6.50 euros.

Old Burda mags used to have far more patterns crammed onto pattern sheets, value – but hard to see. My favourite way of tracing off the patterns while not messing up the original sheets is using sheets of carbon paper hinged together, face down on my pattern paper, with the pattern sheet on top, following the lines with a propelling pencil without lead. If it’s a pattern where I want to add seam allowances, this can be done at the same time using a flexible curve. It’s more tedious than a user ready paper pattern, but so much better than printing out a thousand A4 sheets and taping them together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About jay

I design and draft patterns
This entry was posted in Opinions Questions Rants, Sewing Patterns and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to October Burda

  1. mrsmole says:

    You really hit the nail on the head with descriptions and observations…that wool man’s vest/jacket minus the sleeves looked like something out of a horror movie and the last dress looks like she is wearing a cheap backpack with those skinny inserts. That poor model in the wrap dress is thinking about how long she has to stand there before she can escape.

    Like

  2. fabrickated says:

    I love this post. It’s interesting and observant, and mainly I agree with you. But I like the sleeveless coat – although it seems silly, I think it could be a fun item, especially with a wooly jumper and the coat in something tweedy.

    Like

  3. I bought this issue too, it was the pencil skirt with the front pleats that caught my eye. I had noticed the skirt turned sideways, I’m guessing the stylist thought it looked ridiculously like an apron the right way! I was disappointed with this issue – there’s definitely more choice in my older issues.

    Like

    • jay says:

      The pencil skirt with pleats is a good classic. I have a very similar pattern from my mother’s stash. A balance between some classics and some novelties is fair enough, but this time the novelty is mainly found in weird additions or subtractions.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I cancelled my order a while back and haven’t missed it. Your post doesn’t make me feel I am missing anything important. Like you I can draft my own patterns which means I can avoid the more weird details that Burda appear to enjoy.

    Like

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