Ufology dilemmas

Backstory.  I saw a sleeve I liked in an Armani collection. I ordered red bouclé for the coat, but didn’t want to risk hacking into it without testing the pattern. A test jacket got half made. Afficionados of Fabricland will recognise the cheapo tweed . I had a vision of covering it with appliquéd flowers picking out the colours, probably clustering on one shoulder and dropping casually down the arm and half the front. I cut some experimental shapes and pinned them on. Running this inspiration past the gals in a sewing forum got the coded “have you lost the plot” response. (Nice things said about jacket, ultra lukewarm on the big idea).  I couldn’t find matching fabric pieces in the right texture and colour for the putative appliqué . The half done jacket got tossed in Damnation Drawer, the coat was made and posted.

R C _DSC7649 This week, I thought “to hell with the appliqué” and stitched in the jacket lining. Sadly, in the intervening years, the sleeve idea has gone off the boil. I’m not so wild about it. See the jacket with buttons posed imploringly where the buttonholes would be. Stitch or ditch?

ufo

Meanwhile,  the overshirt in blue crepe progressed a little. Here’s the seam finish I’m using – turn under 3mm and stitch. Balancing the many disadvantages of having learnt to sew pre-zig-zag on a handcrank Singer, the repertoire of old techniques comes in handy.

seamfinish

 

Another pre-loved technique that gets an airing occasionally is old-world back stitching. The handcranks didn’t have a reverse, you had to make a couple of stitches in the wrong direction, needle down, swivel, stitch the seam. I used that method yesterday when turning under  3mm at the pointy end of a facing for a Vee neck. Even the Bernina likes to chew up and swallow tiny points with nothing for the foot to grip. What fun it is dismantling the bobbin race to tease out your facing and untangle it from the thread nest.

pointy end

Advertisements

About jay

I design and draft patterns
This entry was posted in Designed by me, Sewing methods and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Ufology dilemmas

  1. eh-doesn’t matter if others don’t like it-if you like it, go for it. I’d say if you’ve gone off it by now, put in some cheap buttons and donate it to the shelter. It looks well made, just incomplete at the moment, I’m sure someone’ll find it useful. I donate all my finished test stuff and stuff I’ve just plain gone off to the shelter/charity shop. It’ll make you feel good to get it done either way 😉
    That red jacket is absolutely fabulous. BTW I think you were ahead of the times with the applique jacket idea-burda did it on a coat in their Dec 2014 issue 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Finish it, press it, and put it away for a short while. When it comes out again you might feel very positive about it – and if not do as The Perfect Nose suggests and donate it. It’s much too nice to be a duster.

    Like

  3. prttynpnk says:

    follow your muse. You have good taste- how far afield could you go?

    Like

  4. mrsmole says:

    Be bizarre, be bold, finish it and wear it as though it were a designer jacket because it IS! Make sure the sleeve heads are padded and accentuated…be a fashion pioneer! The fabric deserves some buttonholes and a debut!

    Like

  5. fabrickated says:

    Have you put your jacket on the ground? Outside? No wonder it looks unloved! It is probably crying. It is impossible to given an opinion without seeing it on you Jay. But the coat is very stricking with its funnel neck and interesting sleeve heads. Do you like the coat? Do you wear the coat? If so then I would think the jacket would be worth finishing. If you’ve gone off the coat chances are you won’t care for the jacket. But I would put it on with nice jeans or a good skirt, pin it closed and have a good look. The blouse is looking nice.

    Like

    • jay says:

      Jeans! Inspiration Kate, when I’ve got some black jeans made I might like it. That could budge it from the WI niche it seems to want to occupy now.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s