Vogue 8146 and a couple of tips

I started this pattern 5 years ago. I went off my measurements and blithely cut a 14, straight out of my lambswool tweed, not stopping to do a toile. Its marked Very Easy Vogue, and if it had fitted and worked it would have been. You could assemble this in your sleep.

The pattern is constructed as a raglan with a swing back, a pleat in the back and no bust shaping (that is the front is designed to hang down from the bust point). Its also very short. I could have saved myself a whole heap of trouble if I’d done some basic measurements of the pattern tissue or even read the available info before cutting, but I didn’t.

The back length measurement of the jacket is included on the envelope. I can throw the blame on no-one. Its 2 inches below the waist. Don’t be fooled by the sketch.

By the time I picked this out of purdah, I’d already interfaced the front, constructed a dart in the front to get it to be less tent like, taken in the sides losing about four inches, added a band at the bottom to increase the length, placed pockets in the band seam to try to make that alteration look like a design decision, cut some cuff pieces to the sleeves, and redesigned the neckline and collar. I think I had left it at that point because in spite of all the work, it doesn’t hit the spot.

The collar pattern by Vogue is small and cut on straight grain. It didn’t sit well on me. I made it substantially bigger.

The lining was part done in first run through. I cut it from the outer pattern, no lining pattern is given. Buttons were in stash.

I made a quick and easy lined straight skirt from my own pattern draft this week from the remaining fabric. Its a lined straight skirt with back darts, front pleats, invisible back zip, no waistband and kick pleat.

Front Pleats

Front Pleats

Kick Pleat

Kick Pleat

Finishing this project, a couple of tips occurred to me – apart from the huge tip of taking pattern measurements and/or doing a toile like I didn’t, that is.

Tip 1

When you make a hand buttonhole there is a nice line of beads of thread over the raw edge, hiding any mess. If you opt for machine buttonholes, its basically two rows of close zigzag which you cut between. I suppose in some perfect universe you would get those rows positioned so precisely and your cut so neat that the zigzag entirely covered all unravelling bits of fabric and the sharply defined white of the interfacing. I have never got the hang of that. The thread can be snipped clear to give a reasonable result. The interfacing shines resolutely through. Does this happen to you? The answer is to dye the bit of interfacing where the buttonhole will be, ink, felt pen, anything which will tone it down and not mess with any subsequent laundry. On this jacket I used a procion dye because I happened to have some olive green already mixed. No picture but self explanatory.

Tip 2

Quite possibly preaching to the converted here, but I didn’t find any reference to this in any of my sewing books – here’s one way of preventing a kick pleat from dropping if you don’t want top stitching, and the fabric is too bulky to make running the pleat all the way up to the waist a good bet.

You need a triangle of lining fabric to fill in from about the hipline to the pleat. The long edge of the triangle should be on straight grain, so that it won’t stretch. Stitch it to the seam allowance of the back seam and the seam allowance of the top edge of the pleat.

triangle of lining fabric

triangle of lining fabric

lining encloses the triangle of fabric

lining encloses the triangle of fabric

Several shots of me in slightly crumpled, much altered, but finally finished Vogue 8146 follow, as Port Manech on a sunny day is such a beautiful place. The cliffs were golden with blooming gorse, the sloe bushes were snowy with white flowers, bluebells, snowdrops, periwinkles lined the cliff path. If you’ve never visited this part of France btw, the whole coastline is bordered with footpaths, over cliffs, from bay to bay.

our little pad in the country (kidding!)

our little pad in the country (kidding!)

. Risking life and limb to get the hice in view.

sand, sea, pines

sand, sea, pines

Sunshine in March!

Swingy Back

Swingy Back

Redeeming feature of the unremarkable jacket is the swingy back.

defying gravity

defying gravity

Wobbly lurch gets full frontal shot close to cliff edge.

Trying to Capture Cliff Magic

Trying to Capture Cliff Magic

One day I’ll have the right lens with me!

bay vista

bay vista

Nice place, shame about the jacket!

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About jay

I design and draft patterns
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8 Responses to Vogue 8146 and a couple of tips

  1. Beautiful scenery, and not a bad jacket either 😉 Actually, it looks rather impressive in these shots, very ‘To the Manor Born’

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  2. fabrickated says:

    I love that pleat tip – I recently made one and sort of anchored it to the lining, but it feels a bit bulky. May go back and redo it according to your suggestion. I like the suit, especially with the orange sweater.

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    • jay says:

      You can do something similar to anchor pleats that fall from the hip when you want to cut away the bulk of the fabric between hip and waist to give a smoother look. This is handy if making all round pleats in a thicker fabric that doesn’t lie flat.

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  3. Sarah says:

    It’s like the stylish French version of the British tweed suit! Even though it wasn’t an easy make, I think it looks very nice on you.

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  4. Thanks for the pleats tip- it’s a great solution. I like how your suit turned out, the swing of the jacket is quite nice.

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  5. I would love to have a swingy jacket! Lovely scenery too!

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  6. Mary Carroll says:

    I have been watching a lot of period pieces on TV…you look as though you are on a set for one of them. I adore the jacket, especially in these shots!

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  7. mrsmole says:

    It’s a bonus when a garment has been aging long enough that you can resurrect it for a debut. Thank you for the kick pleat tip and for sharing such a beautiful setting. You look so classic and all put together like out of a movie!

    Like

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