Salvage Sewing

Have you heard the murmuring about sewing being a bit hard? Sure it is. For every dozen garments I make ok, a few others flop. Some sewists chuck the failures straight out. Some battle gamely on, wielding the seam ripper, re-cutting pieces and reworking the bad stitching. I put the offender out of sight. Sometimes for a long while. Months or years later, the angst has faded enough to get to grips with the faults. How about you – patient unpicker, steady handed perfectionist, or regular gifter at the recycling centre?

This week I took up salvage operations. First up, the Lazarus of jacketing. Back from its near death experience, Vogue 8146. Finished finally, except pressing and fiddling with the inside seam allowances in the lining I put in.

V8146

V8146

It was a pig of a pattern, ridiculously short (ok I should have read the measurements), with a mean overtight collar, and a cock-eyed imbalance between the front and the back bodice (there’s more of me in the front than the back, Vogue). Unlined too. How great is an unlined tweed jacket?  The thing that attracted me to it was the back, which now its a decent length does swing merrily in a 50s fashion.

jackbk

Next, whilst rifling through the cadavers of so many, many wrecks, a zombie of the jean generation threw a leg out. It had been abandoned with waistband and hems to do, probably because jeans are cheap to buy and boring to make. My curiosity was sparked.  I cut this with three other pairs in a previous stash busting frenzy, using my bog standard jeans block. After a week of reading about jeans and critical eyes seeing unacceptable front crotch wrinkles in many a Ginger jean, I had to know. Does the Aldrich block make a wrinkly front or not?  I checked back on the pictures from Jeaniac posts.

jean

No serious wrinkles in the florid pair, but maybe  the hands in pockets stance hid them. I had to get that waistband on the abandoned pair and check.

jeans

jeans

Wrinkle free when I put them on, but so what? Do you mind about the minutiae of jeans fit? I’m not sure I truly care. Cation Designs has some wrinkle busting fixes if you do.

Last week’s Spring sunshine bunked off.  It’s sooooo cold. (The house too is like a refrigerator, we’ve had the balcony doors open all morning for eclipse photography). I might have a matching skirt done for the jacket by the time we get another sunny day fit for venturing out to photograph clothes. That should take out a bit more stash.

While I’m trying to use up some of my embarassingly large collection of fabric, its cheering to know there’s an alternative.

 

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About jay

I design and draft patterns
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11 Responses to Salvage Sewing

  1. Like you I hide the evidence until I can face sorting things out. I hate to leave things unfinished.
    I didn’t like the Aldrich trouser block – it just didn’t work for me. I have copied some rtw jeans using the Craftsy course which I love.
    I would love to see a picture of you wearing your jacket as I am sure it will look great.

    Liked by 1 person

    • helen says:

      I’ve just completed the Craftsy Jeanius course which I really enjoyed. All done except the rivets and as a replica of my Levi’s they are pretty close.

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      • jay says:

        And Levi’s are pretty expensive, so that would be a treck worth making. I’ve heard a few good things about the course Helen.

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      • helen says:

        I know, I think I paid £85 for the pair I’m copying. Mine are finished – apart from the rivets – and I’m pleased with them. I enjoyed the course but keep an eye on the prices as I paid £12.50 on black Friday but I’ve seen it since at £16 and £29.

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    • jay says:

      What didn’t work out for you in the Aldrich block Materiallady? (I’m slightly surprised its ok an me btw). I’ve yet to get a rtw pair that fit well enough to copy.

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      • It was used when I did my City &Guilds about 25 years ago and just didn’t sit well then. Maybe I need to give it another try – but I like the Ann Haggar block so it would be hard to change.

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  2. fabrickated says:

    I put the pieces in a carrier bag and push it to the back of a cupboard. I have two unfinished knitting projects, a man’s jacket that needs lining, an unfinished pattern for the Knots dress and a few others I can’t remember. I feel guilty, but may sort them out one day.

    In the meantime I laughed out loud at the stash video. It’s brilliant.

    And your floral jeans look very good indeed. But for me I would rather buy jeans than make them.

    Like

    • jay says:

      Knitting is in a class of its own Kate. I’m full of admiration for anyone who can actually finish anything hand knitted bigger than a first size baby matinée jacket and bootees.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. dottiedoodle says:

    Beautiful coat, I love the back. I hate it when sewing goes wrong. I wrote a post yesterday about a top I hid for a year because I messed up the cuffs. It wasn’t even that hard to fix!

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    • jay says:

      I saw the top Dottiedooodle, such a classic look, definitely worth saving. I share those can’t face one more fix moments though – sometimes you’re fed up with altering and fixing and need to leave the work alone for a while.

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  4. mrsmole says:

    The only garments that don’t make an appearance or get a waistband are ones I grew out of and are in a state of suspended animation in the aging closet. What little time I have in January to make anything for myself has to sew up correctly and have ease to work in…aka…sitting on the floor pinning hems for hours. Jeans are too restrictive and hot during the bridal season. It has been disappointing to see so many crappy Ginger jeans with those front drag lines. While the sewers model them standing up I wonder what happens when they sit down…the zippers must be screaming! Your floral jeans look so nice and I look forward to seeing you in the jacket!

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